Remembering and Forgetting at Counterplay 2017: MoRM Returns

This participatory performance and exhibition invites you to think about the process of making memories, to play around with the idea that remembering and forgetting are not always distinct. We ask participants to contribute something they’d like to forget and walk them through a process of dis-remembering, de-archiving, and dis-preserving.

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The politics and ethics of curating others’ memories

Brief reflections on the power of the curation process, as it inevitably carries our own moral codes, furthering our particular ethics. The only way through this tangle is to understand that the point of all of this is not to create The Museum but to engage citizens in a process through which they can think about their own memory-making tendencies.

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Building a conceptual frame for MoRM

Our everyday lives are shot through with questions of politics and history; and now perhaps we need to rethink the Museum’s purpose as providing the space for framing and reflection of each of our relative positions to these larger questions. How, then, to refine our prompt, our approach generally, and develop the role of Museum staff, all towards greater social inquiry and political discovery?

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MoRM and Future Memory

This post explores how the Museum of Random Memory was created and enacted by a group of artists, activists and academics who collaborated on investigating notions of material-, digital- and embodied memories at CounterPlay 2016.

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Reflexivity: Some techniques for interpretive researchers

Reflexivity. We toss this word around as a key part of qualitative methods. Annette Markham writes some techniques for building reflexivity muscles on her blog.

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About

This network of researchers brings together people from industry and academia to explore how we’re building possible futures through our everyday activities of talking, researching, curating, writing, and teaching. These ‘methods’ we use to make sense of our world also shape our future, for ill or good. How can we intervene in this process, to build more sustainable, ethically sensible futures? What do we want to become? Projects and meetings within this network strive to connect practices of inquiry with larger social structures of knowledge and action.

Purpose

Future Making explores creative and transgressive approaches to thinking about scientific and humanistic inquiry practices. We believe that pushing against established disciplinary, methodological, and epistemological boundaries is essential to building robust attitudes and practices within cultures that are ever more impacted by digital media, global networks of connectivity, and technological mediation.

Members

This inter and multi-disciplinary research group is part of the Cultural Transformations Research Programme. Anyone interested in these issues is welcome to join. We have research members from multiple countries, from both academic and non-academic research contexts. To gain the most benefit, members should expect to attend at least one meeting of the research group annually.

Projects

Through a range of ongoing projects, we engage in proactive, future-oriented research that asks such questions as:

The Skagen Institute

Where are the safe spaces for playful and innovative experimentation in methodologies? How might academic institutions value innovative forms of knowledge production?

The Institute of (im)Possible Subjects

How do we trans nationally exchange visual cultures and social justice through media and technoscapes?

Produsing Ethics for the digital (near) future

How can academic researchers lend their intellectual strengths and energies to more directly help create better ethical futures?

Education: The day after tomorrow

How can we merge playful experimentation with educational models to foster critical thinking and digital literacies for future entrepreneurs and world citizens?

Creating future memory

How can citizens better use ethnographic and phenomenology methods to analyse their own lived experience? How can they develop tools to understand, explore, curate their own big data?

All the Feels

How do people talk about feelings in autoethnographic reports, tracking reports or fasting reports?

Visuality, Culture, Methods

How do we approach visuality as a topic of analysis and, in turn, how can we use incorporate the visual in the conduct of our research?

Tracing the Circulation of Communicative Objects

How do different stakeholder groups circulate digital communication objects and what are the implications for the constitution of different kinds of publics?

Partners